Attempt To Donate Frozen Fish From 1984 To Food Bank Fails

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The bag of frozen fish the Johnsons had in their freezer.
The questionable bag of frozen fish the Johnsons had in their freezer.

Grass Valley, CA — Frequent traveler and Cedar Ridge, CA resident Pete Johnson was disappointed when his donation of frozen catfish from 1984 was politely refused by Nevada County Food Bank personnel this week.

“Jennifer told me to clean out the deep freezer on Sunday to make room from the Kiwi lamb we brought back from vacation,” said a somewhat annoyed Mr. Johnson. “That’s when I found this catfish that I caught with my Father in the Delta in 1984. I’m not sure why I kept it all these years. Probably as a memento or something.”

According to Food Bank volunteers, Mr. Johnson attempted to sneak in his 30-year-old freezer-burned catfish in with several expired dented tomato soup cans and one box of Fruit Loops from 2008.

“We appreciate Mr. Johnson’s efforts to help the underprivileged,” commented Food Bank volunteer Amie Applecart, “but they must be edible items. And while everything donated makes a difference for those in need, grossly expired items can not be accepted due to food safety issues.”

Even though Mr. Johnson failed at his attempts to donate food, he is not giving up.

“I have a few more things I’m gonna try donating,” continued Mr. Johnson. “I just hate throwing out food. I mean, I’m not gonna eat this stuff, but somebody might. You know what I mean?”

The Food Bank of Nevada County accepts donations at their 310 Railroad Ave. #100 Grass Valley warehouse MondayThursday from 9 AM2 PM. If you require food assistance, please refer to the program website for details on how they can help you and your family.

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Layne Catherine Anderson
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Layne Catherine Anderson

When I was running a “food pantry” in one of the poorest parishes in americaca, I was often reminded of the axiom, “The road to hell is paved with good intentions.” More than once, when having to turn down “donations” the reply would be, “Well, if they’re hungry enough, they’ll eat it.”

Layne Catherine Anderson
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Layne Catherine Anderson

When I was running a “food pantry” in one of the poorest parishes in americaca, I was often reminded of the axiom, “The road to hell is paved with good intentions.” More than once, when having to turn down “donations” the reply would be, “Well, if they’re hungry enough, they’ll eat it.”