IBM To Continue Its Long Relationship with Authoritarian Regimes

President Donald Trump talks with IBM CEO Ginny Rometty, left, and adviser Jared Kushner during a meeting with business leaders in the State Dining Room of the White House in Washington, Friday, Feb. 3, 2017. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)
President Donald Trump talks with IBM CEO Ginny Rometty, left, and adviser Jared Kushner during a meeting with business leaders in the State Dining Room of the White House in Washington, Friday, Feb. 3, 2017. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

Armonk,  NY —  As the number of companies who have added their names to an amicus brief opposing Trump’s travel ban from seven prominently Muslim counties grows, there is still one glaring corporate omission: IBM. This week the number of companies who have joined the opposition to President Trump’s discriminatory Muslim travel ban reached 312 as HP, Adobe, Trip Advisor and Pandora added their names to the list. To people who have studied and followed the activities of the world’s largest IT Services company, this of course makes complete sense.

“Well, IBM’s history with authoritarian regimes is well documented,” said University of Chicago Professor James Badwater speaking from the Badwater Institute of Public policy. “IBM’s technology helped facilitate Nazi genocide through generation and tabulation of punch cards based upon national census data. The company has never denied its participation with the Third Reich, but rather claims, despite overwhelming evidence to the contrary, that all the work done in Germany was performed by contractors unbeknownst to them. Their answer has always been ‘we didn’t know what they did with it.'” Lots of people turned up dead anyway.

Despite signed documents from IBM’s then CEO Thomas Watson implicating their knowledge of the project, the company still maintains that it had no involvement in lots of dead people. To complicate matters, the company was contracted by the US government to help manage Japanese interment camps during World War II.

Recently there has been a movement from within IBM  to pressure CEO Ginni Rometty to condemn President Trump’s actions as they are in direct conflict with the company’s core value of inclusion and diversity.

“Since November 16, when Ginni Rometty first published her open letter to Trump, thousands of ‘IBMers’ have been organizing and clamoring for a different approach that respects Big Blue’s purported values of diversity, inclusion, and ethical business conduct,” said one not dead source from inside IBM.

As previously reported, then candidate Trump promised to use IBM technology to track Muslims in America, which has raised concerns with civil libertarians that the company might be repeating history.

“I would certainly implement that. Absolutely,” Trump said from his big Oval Office. “And we know IBM has a lot of experience doing just that. They helped Germany set up their tracking system in the 1930s and 40s. They’re good people to work with. Good American people. There should be a lot of systems, beyond databases,” he added. “We should have a lot of systems. Digital catapults and electronic trebuchets. It’s all about management. Our country still has no management.”

When asked if Muslims will be forced to register for such a system, he said without irony, “[t]hey have to be — they have to be.”

avatar
  Subscribe  
Notify of